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Conference Programs Highlight InformEx 2014

The critically acclaimed television show Breaking Bad told the tales of a high school chemistry teacher who, after a diagnosis of advanced cancer, started a methamphetamine laboratory in order to support his family. While this is not the career path the chemical industry wants to endorse, the popular show did demonstrate applied science in action. At InformEx 2014, Donna Nelson, professor of organic chemistry at the University of Oklahoma and a scientific advisor for the program, will discuss her role in the program.

However, InformEx 2014, scheduled for Jan. 21-24 in Miami Beach, Fla., also features more mainstream conference topics. Conference programs are scheduled for Jan. 22-23 and will be located on the show floor. Exhibits are open Jan. 21-24.

The scheduled topics include an analysis of the current state of the pharmaceutical industry, where growth may come from, what new molecules may look like, and services drug manufacturers may require.

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studies, challenges encountered in formulation development and manufacture of clinical trial material when moving from Phase 1 to Phase 2 and 3 studies. Participants can also learn how pharmaceutical companies and CDMOs are aligning sustainability policies and how these programs can generate a significant return on investment.

Other sessions will address vulnerabilities in the chemical supply chain, intellectual property protection, recent advances in chemical technologies for the synthesis of glyochemicals and glycoconjugates, creating value in partnerships between pharma and technology providers, and market opportunities in personalized medicine for the fine, custom and specialty chemicals industry.

On Tuesday, Jan. 21, a full day of exhibitor technology showcases are scheduled.

Networking breakfasts, as well as the InformEx 30th Edition Celebration, provide opportunities for interaction.

More than 3,500 attendees from top pharmaceutical, fine chemical and specialty chemical companies — along with 450 exhibitors — will take part in InformEx 2014, organizers report.

If you are in attendance, please visit Pharmaceutical Technology at booth 1321.

Delivering Complex Parenteral Formulations

Patricia Van Arnum PharmTech editorProgress in delivery science, manufacturing technologies, and commercialization are playing critical roles in advancing the development of complex parenteral drug formulations for new drug substances having a variety of formulation challenges. Unique formulation strategies and solutions are being investigated to extend the release of target peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules for systemic, local, or cellular delivery. Pharmaceutical Technology will hold a live educational webcast, “Complex Parenteral Formulations for the Delivery of Peptides, Proteins, Nucleic Acids and Small Molecules,” on Thursday Nov. 21 from 10:00 to 11:00 AM EST, to examine the delivery science and product development of complex parenteral formulations. Read more »

Regulatory and QA/QC Focus: Elemental Impurity Analysis

Patricia Van Arnum PharmTech editorAs the pharmaceutical industry prepares for changes to compendial and regulatory standards for elemental impurity analysis, QA/QC and laboratory scientists are tasked with adapting their operations to include data management, analysis, and reporting based on inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). Understanding the necessary technical controls to implement and manage analytical operations is crucial to ensure regulatory compliance. Pharmaceutical Technology will present a live educational webcast, “Achieving Regulatory Compliance When Moving to ICP-MS for Elemental Impurity Analysis,” on Wednesday, November 6, 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM EST to provide insight from leading industry experts on ICH, USP, and EMA guidelines for elemental impurity analysis and best practices and strategies to optimize the analytical workflow, data management, and data reporting when using ICP-MS. Read more »

Preparing for Regulatory Inspections

Patricia Van Arnum PharmTech editorRegulatory compliance is of paramount importance to pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies, which must be continually prepared for inspections by FDA, EMA, and other health authorities to meet requirements for good clinical practices (GCP) and good manufacturing practices (GMP). Pharmaceutical Technology will present an educational webcast on Thursday Nov. 7th from 1:00 to 2:00 PM EST, “Ensuring Preparedness for Regulatory Inspections,” which will provide insight on inspection trends and practical advice on how to best prepare for GCP/GMP inspections, examine the key information/documentation sought by regulators, and ways to achieve operational efficiency for providing access to that information. Read more »

Pharma Moves Towards Continuous Manufacturing and Low-Cost Products

It’s Day 2 at CPhI and the remaining findings of the annual expert industry report were released today during the show. As continuous processing continues to revolutionize manufacturing, Emil Ciurczak, principal at Doramax Consulting, believes that large batch production will one day be a thing of the past. Read more »

From Blockbusters to Niche Medicines

CPhI Worldwide and CPhI Pharma Evolution, part of UBM Live’s Pharmaceutical Portfolio, today released Part II of the CPhI annual industry report, in which expert industry panel members share their views on trends that will drive growth and innovation across the pharmaceutical industry over the coming years and beyond.

The pharmaceutical industry is shifting away from the blockbuster model towards the development of personalized medicines and niche, individualized therapies and associated companion diagnostics, noted Sam Venugopal, director, healthcare, PricewaterhouseCoopers. These drugs target specific populations and genomic makeups and are known to have greater efficacy. William Botha, Sensei at Interlean, added that there will also be companies moving towards commodity-based, low-margin products. As a result, one can expect to see increased specialization, particularly amongst small and medium companies. Read more »

FDA, CDER Weigh Organizational Changes

FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg has formed a top-level working group to propose strategies for enhancing agency functions and processes, starting with the relationship between FDA Centers and its field force. The Program Alignment Group (PAG), announced Sept. 6, 2013, will seek to clarify the roles and responsibilities of product centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) to more effectively align practices, processes, and resources. The panel includes the deputy commissioners for food and veterinary medicine, for global regulatory operations and policy, plus the heads of ORA and all Centers to better coordinate inspection and oversight policies and programs throughout the agency.

Key issues are whether more specialization in FDA inspection and compliance functions would be beneficial, and how risk-based models and performance metrics may improve oversight and compliance outcomes. The agency also is looking for ways to achieve more efficient laboratory operations and to coordinate training for ORA and Center staffs.

Hamburg further explained at a conference on biomedical research the next week that her reorganization effort reflects the impact of a more globalized world for medical product development and production. Historically, ORA has fielded generalists able to inspect and evaluate a broad range of regulated products, but the modern era may require a more specialized regulatory staff. And while these issues have been addressed periodically by FDA Centers, including the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), the PAG will seek a more cohesive approach that considers the differences and needs of all regulated product areas.

CDER director Janet Woodcock, who is on the PAG, sees its mission paralleling her initiative to modernize how CDER regulates pharmaceutical quality. Woodcock seeks to establish an Office of Pharmaceutical Quality (OPQ), which similarly would coordinate drug compliance activities with ORA and take steps to clarify roles and responsibilities of CDER offices and to establish metrics and accountability.

At the PDA/FDA joint regulatory conference Sept. 16, Woodcock emphasized that CDER has to change the way it regulates industry to ensure an agile manufacturing sector that can reliably produce quality medicines, with less extensive agency oversight. One innovation would be to reorganize the review of the manufacturing portion of drug applications according to dosage forms and their predictable “failure modes.” Most product recalls, she noted, involve formulation design problems, such as particulates in parenterals and dissolution failures with solid oral products. This approach will involve setting clinically relative specifications and identifying what changes raise risks for drug safety and efficacy – and what do not.

The PAG is slated to give Hamburg an initial plan for operational changes by early December. And CDER hopes that OPQ will become a reality early next year, said Keith Webber, acting director of CDER’s Office of Pharmaceutical Science, at the PDA conference. The reorganization process is slow, as CDER’s OPQ proposal requires approval by HHS officials and has to be vetted by the Office of Management and Budget; some members of Congress also may want to review how the changes could affect drug shortages and patient access to medicines.

Meeting Technical and Regulatory Requirements for Organic Impurity Control and Analysis

Patricia Van Arnum PharmTech editorProduct quality is of paramount importance to pharmaceutical manufacturers, and implementing a strategy for impurity control is crucial. Organic impurities cover a wide spectrum of compounds that have varying structures, behaviors, and characteristics. Organic impurities can result from the manufacturing process, storage conditions, or degradation resulting from light, heat, and other external factors. Deciding what technology or analytical methods to use to detect and measure organic impurities is a challenge. Pharmaceutical Technology will hold a live educational webcast, “Meeting Regulatory and Technical Requirements for Organic Impurity Analysis, on Tuesday Sept. 24 at 11:00 AM EDT to 12:00 PM EDT to provide insight on the regulatory, compendial, and ICH requirements for organic impurity control and analysis as well as best practices in analytical method development, method selection, and method validation for detecting and quantifying organic impurities in drug substances and drug products.

The panelists for the webcast will be: Timothy Watson, PhD, and research fellow in the GCMC Advisory Office at Pfizer and a member of the PhRMA Expert Working Group on the ICH Q11 regulatory guidance document for drug substances; Mark Argentine, PhD, senior research advisor, analytical sciences R&D with Eli Lilly; and Hildegard Bruemmer, PhD, operational laboratory manager, SGS Life Science Services, Berlin. The panelists will provide insight on the regulatory and compendial requirements for organic impurity control and analysis in drug substances and drug products. They will also share insight on selecting the appropriate analytical methods for the detection, analysis, and quantification of organic impurities and offer related case studies on how best to ensure product quality.

Audience members may ask questions of the panelists during the live webcast. Information on how to register for the webcast, “Meeting Regulatory and Technical Requirements for Organic Impurity Analysis” for Tuesday Sept. 24 at 11:00 AM EDT to 12:00 PM EDT and for on-demand viewing is available here.

Prepare for Serialization Now

Upcoming requirements in the US and around the world for serialization and track and trace of pharmaceuticals were a focus of the Pharmapack conference held in Philadelphia, PA earlier this week. Momentum toward implementing these technologies across packaging lines is building as deadlines, including California’s requirements in 2015 and others around the world, approach. After listening to several presentations and a panel discussion, the message I heard loud and clear was that time is of the essence and that packagers should prepare for serialization now. Read more »

Risk-Mitigation Strategies in Drug Manufacturing for Emerging Markets

Patricia Van Arnum PharmTech editorRisk and reward. It is a balance that has to be achieved in any business endeavor and is of utmost importance for pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies managing their growth and manufacturing in emerging markets. Emerging markets are a crucial part of pharmaceutical companies’ growth strategies, but in serving those markets, pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical manufacturers must align that strategy with partners that can facilitate access to local markets, manage complex supply chains, meet global and national regulatory standards for quality, and secure production for local as well as established markets in North America and Western Europe. Read more »

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